Uber S-1 Reveals Millions Paid For Google Maps, Its Multi-Cloud Bet

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Uber S-1 Reveals Millions Paid For Google Maps, Its Multi-Cloud Bet





Uber's Blockbuster Cloud Approach

Uber Technologies has adopted a multi-cloud cloud computing approach to help power the ride-hailing company’s platform, according to a regulatory filing last week that also reveals how much it’s paying to use Google Maps to chart its drivers’ routes and its extended relationship with the tech giant and its parent company.

A small number of third-party service providers hosts a significant portion of its platform, with Uber using a combination of cloud computing vendors and co-located data centers in the United States and abroad, according to its required S-1 registration statement filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission prior to its planned initial public offering (IPO).

“We have assembled a team of more than 3,000 highly skilled engineers and computer scientists whose expertise spans a broad range of technical areas,” Uber said in the filing. “We have built leading proprietary technology for marketplace demand prediction, matching and dispatching, and pricing, routing and payments. We also make significant investments in product and feature development, data management and personalization technologies, and large-scale systems and scalable infrastructure. We have developed our infrastructure to be highly automated, enabling us to improve our platform and add new features with rapid velocity.”

Google parent company Alphabet Inc. owns an approximately 5 percent stake in Uber – its venture capital arm invested more than $250 million in the transportation disruptor in 2013 — and it stands to make more than $5 billion if Uber’s public offering results in a $100 billion valuation. Uber’s Alphabet ties extend to Google Cloud, Google Maps and Google Pay.

Read on to learn about Uber’s payouts to Google divisions, its multi-cloud approach to business, lingering troubles related to its 2016 data breach hosted by cloud platform Amazon Web Services (AWS), its cloud industry hires and their lawsuits, and its possible foray into “cloud” kitchens.



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