Apple this week unveiled the new 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pros powered by Apple Silicon M1 Pro and M1 Max chips. A earlier benchmark already revealed that the M1 Max CPU delivers twice the performance of the M1 chip, and now a metal score from Geekbench 5 shows that the M1 Max offers up to 181% faster graphics than the GPUs of the previous 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Another benchmark test run on the new MacBook Pro that was recently uploaded to the Geekbench website shows that the GPU of the M1 Max chip scored 68870 points in the Geekbench 5 Metal test. According to the website, the score comes from the high-end version of the M1 Max chip with 64 GB of RAM.

Another benchmark test with the new MacBook Pro shows that the GPU of the M1 Max chip scores 68870 points in the Geekbench 5 Metal test. According to the website, the score comes from the high-end version of the M1 Max chip with 64 GB of RAM.

Compared to the AMD Radeon Pro 5300M, the GPU in the base model of the previous 16-inch MacBook Pro with Intel processor, the M1 Max chip has 181% faster graphics, as the AMD 5300M in Geekbench 5. Achieved only 24461 points Even compared to the best available GPU of the previous model (which is the AMD Radeon Pro 5600M), the M1 Max still has 62% more powerful graphics.

This score puts the new MacBook Pro with the M1 Max chip on par with the now discontinued iMac Pro, which had a model with the AMD Radeon Pro Vega 56 GPU.

While the M1 Pro chip comes with 14-core and 16-core GPUs, the M1 Max chip has a 32-core GPU with unified memory, which means it gets the same 32 or 64 GB of RAM for graphics shares. Apple advises that the memory bandwidth speed will reach 400 GB / s. Of course, this makes the new MacBook Pro more than ideal for graphics-intensive tasks.

The new 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro are available for pre-order now, and the first units are expected to be shipped next week.

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