Amazon Pledges to Make Half Its Shipments Carbon Neutral by 2030



Photo Credit: Julie Clopper/Getty Images

On the long road to making all Amazon shipments net zero carbon, the company announced a short-term goal to reach 50 percent by 2030.

The initiative, dubbed “Shipment Zero,” will rely heavily on progressive technologies like electric vehicles, aircraft biofuels, reusable packaging, and renewable energy.

“Amazon has a long-term goal to power our global infrastructure using 100 percent renewable energy, and we are making solid progress,” Dave Clark, senior vice president of worldwide operations, wrote in a blog post. “For the first time we can now see a path to net zero carbon delivery of shipments to customers.”

Last year, the firm teamed with Procter & Gamble and Hasbro to reinvent boxes, reduce waste, and simplify packaging. It also boasts a network of solar and wind farms, as well as solar fulfillment center rooftops.

“It won’t be easy to achieve this goal,” Clark admitted. “But it’s worth being focused and stubborn on this vision and we’re committed to seeing it through.”

As part of this journey, Amazon will share its company-wide carbon footprint later this year.

Monday’s announcement comes on the heels of a new Greenpeace report, highlighting what it calls Amazon’s “dirty cloud.”

The environmental organization denounced Amazon Web Services (AWS) for failing to deliver on its commitment to shifting to renewable energy, claiming the company’s Virginia data centers are powered by only 12 percent renewable energy (compared with Facebook’s 37 percent, Microsoft’s 44 percent, and Apple’s 100 percent).

Amazon did not immediately respond to Geek’s request for comment. But an AWS spokesperson told Windpower Engineering that Greenpeace’s data is inaccurate.

“The report does not properly highlight that AWS has been a major investor in solar projects across the Commonwealth of Virginia and played a leading role in making it easier for us and other companies to bring more renewable energy to Virginia,” the statement said.

More on Geek.com:





Source link